Trebuchet The sling is where the method is defense

Trebuchet CatapultA trebuchet catapult is a machine that was used as early as the 4th century and was used by the Mohists in ancient China. It works by the energy used by the counterweight being dropped which then launches the load. For further distance, the counterweight needs to be heavier than the load, this is because the counterweight pivots around a much shorter distance. However increasing the mass of the counterweight to a certain point will not help,  because the speed of the counterweight is just a free-fall speed. The sling is where the method is defense is placed, such as boulders. The sling doubled the power of the machine and caused it to throw the projectile twice as far.  The word “Trebuchet” comes from the French word “Trebucher” meaning to throw over. It was a medieval attack weapon used to throw heavy boulders to smash castles and and walls. The men who operated the machines were called Gynours. The trebuchet was capable of launching 200 pound rocks up to 300 yards. These machines were so massive they were required to build on site of the war. The Traction Trebuchet used people as the power source. The Counterpoise Trebuchet replaced the people power source with weight on the short end. The Trebuchet was used in the Siege of Dover in 1216 in England. The constable of Dover Castle was Hugh de Burgh and refused to give up. Chief engineer, Master James of St. George, began working on a new more massive design and they named it the Warwolf. The Warwolf is thought to be the most powerful and most famous trebuchet design in history. Although the trebuchet is not used to sling massive rocks at enemies anymore, it is still around today. The current day people use the trebuchet to teach high school and college students about load, force, fulcrums, velocity, and gravity. The trebuchet is also used to recruit students for engineering programs. It is not only a learning tool, but also fun. In class we launched soft balls, but you can launch just about anything. For example, pumpkins, and watermelons. Those would be fun to see splaster everywhere.  Sources:http://www.lordsandladies.org/trebuchet.htmhttp://www.ancientfortresses.org/trebuchet.htmhttps://www.real-world-physics-problems.com/trebuchet-physics.html

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