The value of human life is being threatened by

The Church’s social teaching is a rich treasure of wisdom about building a just society and living lives of holiness amidst the challenges of modern society. In these brief reflections, we highlight several of the key themes that are at the heart of our Catholic social tradition.Life and Dignity of the Human PersonThe Catholic Church proclaims that human life is sacred and that the dignity of the human person is the foundation of a moral vision for society. This belief is the foundation of all the principles of our social teaching. In our society, human life is under direct attack from abortion and euthanasia. The value of human life is being threatened by cloning, embryonic stem cell research, and the use of the death penalty.  Call to Family, Community, and ParticipationThe person is not only sacred but also social. How we organize our society — in economics and politics, in law and policy — directly affects human dignity and the capacity of individuals to grow in community. Marriage and the family are the central social institutions that must be supported and strengthened, not undermined. We believe people have a right and a duty to participate in society, seeking together the common good and well-being of all, especially the poor and vulnerable.Rights and ResponsibilitiesThe Catholic tradition teaches that human dignity can be protected and a healthy community can be achieved only if human rights are protected and responsibilities are met. Therefore, every person has a fundamental right to life and a right to those things required for human decency. Corresponding to these rights are duties and responsibilities–to one another, to our families, and to the larger society. Option for the Poor and VulnerableA basic moral test is how our most vulnerable members are faring. In a society marred by deepening divisions between rich and poor, our tradition recalls the story of the Last Judgment (Mt 25:31-46) and instructs us to put the needs of the poor and vulnerable first.The Dignity of Work and the Rights of WorkersThe economy must serve people, not the other way around. Work is more than a way to make a living; it is a form of continuing participation in Gods creation. If the dignity of work is to be protected, then the basic rights of workers must be respected–the right to productive work, to decent and fair wages, to the organization and joining of unions, to private property, and to economic initiative.Solidarity -We are one human family whatever our national, racial, ethnic, economic, and ideological differences. We are our brothers and sisters keepers, wherever they may be. Loving our neighbor has global dimensions in a shrinking world. At the core of the virtue of solidarity is the pursuit of justice and peace. Pope Paul VI taught that if you want peace, work for justice.1 The Gospel calls us to be peacemakers. Our love for all our sisters and brothers demands that we promote peace in a world surrounded by violence andCare for Creation. Respect for human life means respecting all of God’s creation. We must re-engage with our environment and take responsibility for it; live sustainably, live so that there are enough resources for everyone. I have always considered myself a very promising student. I have worked extremely hard and received high grades. I have a close knit group of friends and my teachers and I have mutual respect for each other .Although I would consider myself at this present stage ‘fulfilled’ something was missing. I realized it wasn’t a materialistic aspect of my life. Through a tragic incident I finally discovered what fit perfectly in that vacancy. The consecutive hospitalizations of my grandparents evoked great pain and sorrow. I have decided to try to make a foundation after my grandfather for kids who can not afford school supplies and other things they need. You have the power to change the word I will always remeber that caus thats what he told me.You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” – Mahatma Ghandi “Love cannot remain by itself — it has no meaning. Love has to be put into action and that action is service.” – Mother Teresa I have always enjoyed the feeling that I acquired after doing a good deed or simply helping someone out. However  through volunteering I have learned that many organizations exist only with the help of volunteers from the community, I have seen the amount of joy that volunteering brings to those who youand others who are helping out, I discovered a feeling of self-satisfaction that no other activity can bring, and lastly I have learned to spend my time wisely. People’s lives are changed every day by their actions and experiences. One experience that I will always remember is the day I saw a kid I disliked alot came into Biology class late like usally but this time his face was red, his eyes were puffy and he could barley speak and his breathing was not normal and he was trying to tell us what had happened but he couldnt get words out to tell us what was wrong. Mrs Scott took him to he back of the room and he finally was able to calm down he said his grandmother died and she was teh reason he played basketball. As myslef was thinking I thought I had to do something specail for him cause I know how he feels At the end of my voluteer time I have deceide to major in sports pyschology to help athlete’s feel like they are worth something and to find there confidence and voice.