Global campaign of white American business people that shape

Global Citizen 

Someone who sees themselves as part of an
emerging sustainable world community is a known as a global citizen. 
These members’ actions support the values and the practices of their
community.   Everyone today can identify with being global citizens
as more of their lives become globalized.  Being a globalized citizen does
not imply that one is to give up their identities or their citizenship,
allegiance, religious or ethnic group.  In being a global citizen, it
means that your identity has another layer added to who you are. 

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Commerce  

In a commerce transaction there are two roles; a seller and a buyer.  Each role has its own agenda, where they both want to cooperate to
find an acceptable solution that is agreed upon. In each of the roles there are
a set of beliefs and expectations about the purpose and the agenda in a
transaction.  There are also beliefs and expectations about the others
roles. According to  

 

  

Economic globalization of the U.S business
and consumer culture as the campaign of white American business people that
shape the world’s economy and market cultures into images of their own has been
the examination of historians for years.        

 

Globalization has had a
large impact on the employment and economic life of the black community. 
Deindustrialization is on aspect of a global economic restructuring that has
resulted from new productive, information, communication, and computer
technologies (Cross, 2008). 

 

Appraisal  

African Americans were bought to this
country as slaves.  The purpose of our existence in this country was not to be treated equally, but to labor and build.  We were to develop this country but were not to be privileged to enjoy the fruits of our labor. Through the years and despite our efforts, we as a people have never been considered good or worthy
enough for fair and just treatment. The African American society has always
been held to an unmeasurable standard.  But through all adversity, the African American society has
shown an impeccable amount of courage and strength to overcome.  

For the African American society, being a part of this country we
were not given the ability to exercise the same rights as “White
America”.  In the development of the new and emerging county, African Americans have been slighted to be able to be free citizens and maintain the
essential parts of our culture.  In the very country that we built, our
efforts were treated with many disregards and our allies seemed to not exist
but our enemies were prevalent as they were the very same persons who we built
this country for.   

Although there have been dramatic developments, many
economic and the characteristic of demographics for the African Americans at
the end of the nineteenth century weren’t much different than what they had
been during the mid-1800’s.  According to
Maloney, “the nineteenth century was a time of radical
transformation in the political and legal status of African Americans. Blacks
were freed from slavery and began to enjoy greater rights as citizens (though
full recognition of their rights remained a long way off) (Maloney, 2002).”   

A number of scholars have speculated that
racial discrimination plays a role in the decisions regarding where new plants
(and new jobs) are placed by foreign investors (David et al, 2006). In the 1940’s African Americans who had education that
was less than college level, worked predominately in factories.  When
these jobs became outsourced and the loss of manufacturing jobs were lessen,
the African American society, felt undermined of their opportunities for
employment.   

According to Johnson Jr., Burthey III,
and Ghrom, the successful history of African American entrepreneurs have
demonstrated time and time again the uncanny ability to turn adversity into
opportunity in dealing with internal challenges as well as the external threats
(Johnson Jr., Burthey III, and Ghrom, 2008).  Discrimination and racism has always been a complex
problem in the African American society.  This racism and discrimination
cannot be described into certain categories as it has different complications
and lasting effects.