At been outcasts before this point. Finally, Paul D

At the beginning of the chapter, Denver is distrustful of Paul D, and is reluctant to even attend the carnival. Sethe wants to attend the carnival despite her knowing they shouldn’t, and Paul D is yearning for any sort of connection to the town and its people so that he may feel more inclined to stay, and also be able to help out both Sethe and Denver. By the end of the chapter, Sethe begins to think that with Paul D there to support her, she may be able to confront her past and move on in a way where she can try and live out the rest of her life in content, with Denver alongside her. Denver and Paul D begin to reconcile with each other, as Denver enjoys the carnival, and Paul D pampers her the whole day with buying her whatever she asks for. Similarly, Sethe and Denver begin reconciliation with the community, as the community sees how happy Paul D is, and begins to warm up to the two of them who had been outcasts before this point. Finally, Paul D begins to feel at home in Cincinnati, his abundant amount of joy towards the carnival on display for not only Sethe and Denver, but the rest of the community. It is in this way that the chapter works in a circular fashion, and Morrison is asserting that the trio all need each other in their own way, even if they are hesitant to open up. Since the chapter and overall book seems to be working in a sort of cycle, it can also be assumed that the trio will separate again, and will struggle once more. The steps and routes by which the three characters come closer to one another is through their dedication to each other’s happiness and the way that the three slowly open up to one another. Paul D makes Sethe think she can open up again, which in turn leads her to form a stronger bond with Denver, which leads Denver to not only trust Paul D more, but also open up herself. This is also a circular motion, and it is evident that Morrison plays with circular themes a lot in this novel.